Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Sep 20, 201809:28 AM
Haute Plates

Our weekly blog on the New Orleans fine dining scene

Catering

I attended the 25th anniversary of Joel Catering at Il Mercato on Wednesday evening. It was pretty sweet. 

I should note at the outset that I’ve known Joel for a while and consider him a friend. I’ve certainly written about him in the past, but as always I write about things and people I like and make no apologies for it.

Catering doesn’t get the respect it deserves. I think most chefs would agree that it’s one thing to turn 200 tables over a night, and another to turn 200 tables at once. My experience with catering is probably like yours – there are events at which we’re served steamed vegetables and a protein that could be chicken or could be something else. It’s easy to do that. It’s a lot harder to put out dozens or hundreds of the same plate all at once with the same quality and consistency you’d expect from a fine dining restaurant.

But that’s what Joel’s does, and what it’s done year in and out. Twenty-five years, to be precise. The food I had on Wednesday was the work of chef Bryan Clark. He’s a New Orleans native, and started as a cook with Joel’s. I was late to the event, given that I had to pick my kids up from school and get dinner started, but what I had was excellent. Oysters, scallops with squid ink tagliatelle, perfectly poached shrimp and a little savory pot au crème. It was all good.

Twenty-five years is, I guess, not all that long in the context of New Orleans, but it’s a pretty good run for a restaurant and a damn fine run for a catering company. I don’t think Joel’s is going anywhere any time soon, either. I don’t know that I’ll be around for the 50th, but a man can hope.

 

 

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags


Haute Plates

Our weekly blog on the New Orleans fine dining scene

about

Robert D. Peyton was born at Ochsner Hospital and, apart from four years in Tennessee for college and three years in Baton Rouge for law school, has lived in New Orleans his entire life. He is a strong believer in the importance of food to our local culture and in the importance of our local food culture, generally. He has practiced law since 1994, and began writing about food on his website, www.appetites.us, in 1999. He mainly wrote about partying that year, obviously.

In 2006, New Orleans Magazine named Appetites the best food blog in New Orleans. The choice was made relatively easy due to the fact that Appetites was, at the time, the only food blog in New Orleans.

He began writing the Restaurant Insider column for New Orleans Magazine in 2007 and has been published in St. Charles Avenue, Louisiana Life and New Orleans Homes and Lifestyles magazines. He is the only person he knows personally who has been interviewed in GQ magazine, albeit for calling Alan Richman a nasty name. He is not proud of that, incidentally. (Yes, he is.)

Robert’s maternal grandmother is responsible for his love of good food, and he has never since had fried chicken or homemade biscuits as good as hers. He developed his curiosity about restaurant cooking in part from the venerable PBS cooking show "Great Chefs" and has an extensive collection of cookbooks, many of which do not require coloring, and some of which have not been defaced.

Robert lives in Mid-City with his wife Eve and their three children, and is fond of receiving comments and emails. Please humor him.

recent

archive

feed

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Haute Plates Feed »

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags