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Mar 6, 201910:55 AM
The Editor's Room

Weekly Commentary with New Orleans Magazine’s Errol Laborde

Ash Wednesday

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I once worked in an office where on the day after Mardi Gras I noticed the two girls at the front desk each had ashen crosses on their forehead. At first I thought it was touching that they had gone to church where, by tradition, the priest would make the appropriate smudge to remind followers of the somber message that to dust we shall return.

By their giggles I sensed that the girls were not effected by the piety of the day, especially when I realized that both smoked and each has blessed the other with the char from their ashtray.

To me, Ash Wednesday’s message is not as much about returning to dust but reclaiming reality, and there is a certain spirituality in that too. We in New Orleans are a blessed people to live in a place with European and Caribbean charm, but with United States strength and amenities. Add to that a season when masking in the streets is encouraged; where we beg for baubles just for the sheer numbers; where the litter piles sparkle with beads; and where the rhythm is often that of our native music. It must be that too much of this experienced all the time certainly should be sinful. But there is Ash Wednesday to remind us that a life of feasting needs moments of fasting.

There was a time when, according to tradition, the ashes smudged on by the priests on Good Friday came from burning the leftover palms from Palm Sunday. Now slivers have replaced the full palms and the ash stash, I suspect, is down. Life changes: Many of the old churches are closed; there are fewer priests. Yet we celebrate with more persistence and fervor than ever, all the more to remember the counter-balancing message. We are denied little in our lives. 

A smudge on Ash Wednesday could be a spiritual message or perhaps a splash of makeup that survived removal. Either way we need to find peace with our body and our soul. Jazz Fest, after all, is never too far away.

 

--30--

 

BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT: Errol’s Laborde’s books, “New Orleans: The First 300 Years” and “Mardi Gras: Chronicles of the New Orleans Carnival” (Pelican Publishing Company, 2017 and 2013), are available at local bookstores and at book websites.

WATCH INFORMED SOURCES, FRIDAYS  AT 7 P.M., REPEATED AT 11:30 P.M. WYES-TV, CH. 12.

 

 

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The Editor's Room

Weekly Commentary with New Orleans Magazine’s Errol Laborde

about

Errol LabordeErrol Laborde holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of New Orleans and is the editor-in-chief of Renaissance Publishing. In that capacity he serves as editor/associate publisher of New Orleans Magazine and editor/publisher of Louisiana Life magazine.

Errol is also a producer and a regular panelist on Informed Sources, a weekly news discussion program broadcast on public television station WYES-TV, Channel 12. Errol is a three-time winner of the Alex Waller Award, the highest award given in print journalism by the Press Club of New Orleans. He also received the National and City Regional Magazine Association Award for Best Column for his New Orleans Magazine column, beating out 76 city magazines across the country. In 2013, Errol received the award for the "Best News Affiliated Blog," awarded by the Press Club of New Orleans.

Errol’s most recent books are Krewe: The Early Carnival from Comus to Zulu and Marched the Day God: A History of the Rex Organization. In his free time he enjoys playing tennis and traveling with his wife, Peggy, to anywhere they can get away to, but some of his favorite spots are the Caribbean and historic locations around Louisiana. You can reach Errol at (504) 830-7235 or errol@myneworleans.com.

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