Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Peggy & Aaron Selber

"i will teach the next generation about giving back"

Peggy: Board member, Aaron or Peggy Selber Foundation, Inc., Burkenroad-Selber Foundation
Aaron: Managing Partner, Aaron or Peggy Selber Oil Company

Peggy
Education: National Cathedral School, Washington, D.C.; Newcomb College; Centenary College in Shreveport

Family: Husband, Aaron; four daughters, Patty, Pamela, Polly and Penny

Mentors: My parents, Evelyn and William Burkenroad, Jr. and my husband

Aaron
Education: C.E. Byrd High School in Shreveport, Bachelor’s degree in business from Tulane University; Member of the United States Army/Air Force, 1946-47

Family: Wife, Peggy; four daughters, Patty, Pamela, Polly and Penny

Mentors: My father, Aaron Selber, Sr.; my father-in-law, William Burkenroad, Jr. and Jack Aron

Aaron Selber, Jr. doesn’t let the fact that he’s 84 years old stop him from traveling around the country for his investment business, cheering on LSU at home games, duck hunting in Arkansas or working out four days a week.

His wife, Peggy Burkenroad Selber, is equally active as a three-time Shreveport City Champion golfer, community member and board member of non-profits in both Shreveport and New Orleans.

They first met in the late 1940s in New Orleans when he attended Tulane University and she went to Newcomb College. He was from Shreveport, where his family owned Selber Brothers, a chain of retail stores. She was from New Orleans, the granddaughter of Willliam Burkenroad, Sr., co-founder of J. Aron & Co. Coffee Importers. They married in 1952 and moved to Shreveport where they raised four daughters and continued their families’ traditions of immersing themselves into the community and in community service.
 
Why give back to the community? Aaron: We were trained to do it. My family was generous, Peggy's family was very generous. We all believe in philanthropy.
 
How are you are passing that spirit on to your grandchildren? Peggy: Our grandchildren have to give a certain amount of the money we give them to a charity. It’s character building — finding where the needs are in the city.
 
What sports did you play growing up? Peggy: Tennis was my big sport in high school; when I moved to Shreveport, I started playing golf. I was a six handicapper once. Aaron: I’m a letterman at Tulane. I played on the baseball team. In the army, I played baseball and basketball for the Andrews Air Force Base.
 
How were sports different for women in the 1940s? Peggy: Women played half court instead of full court in basketball. We didn’t run as far.
 
How do you stay connected to New Orleans? Aaron: I am involved in various organizations and have been since the 1970’s. Tulane also keeps me connected. I’m on the board of Tulane’s Business School Council and we helped fund the Burkenroad Ethics Program at the school.
 
What keeps you young? Aaron: I only go to lunch with people 65 years or younger. I don't want to hear complaints about health or what’s wrong with the country. I want to hear what people are doing.

iBERIABANK is proud to present a series of profiles featuring entrepreneurs, volunteer activists and artists whose work is making a difference. As iBERIABANK continues to make significant investments in our community, this special feature focuses on a few individuals who are doing the same.

While we can not include everyone who is inspiring change and worthy of recognition, we are proud to highlight a select few who give tirelessly to our community with their time, energy and passion.

Add your comment:
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags