Letters

FINDING Modine
As a fourth-generation New Orleanian, I look forward to receiving New Orleans Magazine every month. I first turn to read “Modine’s New Orleans.”

When are we going to see published a collection of her monthly articles? I have a dozen friends around the world whom I would like to educate on our delightful culture.

John Charles Rosen
Carriere, MS


Ed. Reply: You would never know it by looking at her, but Modine is a publishing mogul. She has published three books. Never Clean Your House During Hurricane Season is available at Octavia Books in New Orleans and at Amazon.com.

Never Sleep With a Fat Man in July is also available. Write to Liz Scott, 300 Orleans Ave., Folsom, La, 70437, with a $15 check made out to Hope House.

Never Heave Your Bosom in a Front-Hook Bra, the first book of Modine columns, and the only one fully illustrated, is out of print, but you can search Abe Books online or other used book stores and might turn up a copy.

All this information is available at ModineG.com and you can read her latest column on pg. 54.


Voice in Radio

Re: “New Orleans’ Media Makeover: Radio Changes – Coming and Going,” Speaking Out column. October 2012 issue.

The sarcasm, “Religion is at its best when it feeds the poor. It is less useful when it sells time on radio stations,” mentioned in the article “New Orleans’ Media Makeover” is certainly most unprofessional journalism. To demean a class of people who want to have a voice in radio seems that the interest of the New Orleans Magazine is geared to believing any variation of what it considers worthy of radio time is a waste. What a disappointment to read this in New Orleans Magazine.

Louise Abry
Harahan


Ed. Reply: We did not “demean a class of people.” As we acknowledged, “religious radio certainly has a right to exist.” Our point was that religious radio tends to have very small audiences. We regret that a historic local radio frequency (690 AM) will no longer be reaching a wider audience or providing a voice for the community. Ideally there should be other frequencies accessible to small niche specialty programming.


Defining Lakeshore

Re: Letters. October 2012 issue. In reference to: Julia Street column. June 2012 issue.

Your response incorrectly states that the Lake area is now commonly referred to as “Lake Vista” and that “Lakeshore” is rarely used. The residents of Lakeshore would be surprised to hear this as they, as well as residents of Lake Vista, go to great lengths to make sure that city officials (and everyone else) knows the distinction between the two neighborhoods. In fact, the more common (and incorrect) usage has been to lump all four lake area subdivisions as “Lakeview” or “Gentilly.” Perhaps that is what you meant to write.

Susan M. Garcia, President, LVPOA
New Orleans


Ed. Reply: Yes, we were referring to the common usage and making the point that such usage isn’t always correct. Another example, Central City, is frequently referred to in the media as being part of Mid-City though the two neighborhoods are completely different.


Reading The Advocate

We live in Lakeview. Yesterday afternoon we ordered our subscription to the N.O. edition of The Advocate. This morning our first copy arrived before 5:30 a.m.!

I like what I’ve seen of The Advocate so far. It seems to be a quality newspaper with journalistic integrity. The local coverage is a bit thin, but what they’ve done is thorough, and no doubt there will be more emphasis on N.O. as they grow.

Their website is excellent and in sharp contrast to the T-P. All in all, it’s a better newspaper than the T-P and deserves our support.

Sabina Barash
New Orleans


Ed. Reply: We maintain our position that New Orleans deserves, and needs, a daily newspaper. We wish The Advocate well.

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