William Borah is a noted local land use attorney. The City of New Orleans owes a huge debt of gratitude to Borah, but few New Orleanians have any idea why. In 1946, prominent New York planner, Robert Moses, proposed that New Orleans build an elevated expressway along the riverfront. It would pass through the French Quarter in front of Jackson Square, and continue upriver past Audubon Park. The  proposal had widespread, strong support by the governor, the mayor, the local newspaper, and the city’s influential business community. Nevertheless, in the face of overwhelming odds against them, Borah and other dedicated preservationists were able to stop the proposed expressway. The roadway would have destroyed a key feature of New Orleans: her beautiful, vital riverfront. Borah knew that an elevated expressway would cut New Orleans off from the Mississippi River and ruin the city’s historic character. On Thursday, March 10, 2016, from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Borah will share a first-hand account of the controversy. The event is sponsored by the Louisiana Landmark Society. Admission is free for members, and $5.00 for non-members. The address is Turner’s Hall, 938 Lafayette Street.

 

 

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