Author: Errol Laborde

Bullets On A Sunday Afternoon

  Last Sunday afternoon (June 6) around 6:15 I was driving toward the river on Canal Street waiting for a light to change on the block between South Rampart St. and University Place (Now called “Roosevelt Way”). All was quiet,…

D-Day: Charging Through Time

  Some kids were playing on Omaha Beach, building sandcastles. Nearby an adult couple walked along the sand at shore’s edge, presumably looking for shells, the nautical kind rather than those fired from cannons. The shards of war have long…

Streetcar: The Creole Tomato

  Not to be bragging or anything, but I once happened to meet and talk to the Queen of the Creole Tomato Festival. The festival is held annually in the Dutch Alley section of the French Market. Given the demands…

A View From Bruning's: West End's Glory Days

  Sometimes neighboring political bodies join together to forge historic agreements. Few are as anticipated by those who remember the old days along the lake as the efforts by Jefferson Parish’s and New Orleans’ councils to redevelop West End. The…

What Stagger Lee Brought to Lundi Gras

  According to the legend, “the night was clear, and the moon was yellow, and the leaves came tumbling down.”  At this point Lloyd Price, a native of Kenner who was one of the top rhythm and blues performers of…

Going For the Gold: Rah-Rah Rugby

  Several years ago, when e-mail was young, I got a message from a freelance writer in New York state who was pitching a story idea. A couple of times during our exchanges she used the word “scrum.” Born and…

In Memoriam

  Pamela Marquis, a longtime contributor to various titles at Renaissance Publishing, died unexpectedly on May 4. A devoted gardener, Marquis’ gardening column and other contributions to New Orleans Homes kept readers in the know not only with trends and…

May Day for St. Joseph

  May Day, last Saturday, was spent at a St. Joseph’s Day altar.  I know, according to the calendar, someone got the dates wrong, but a world turned upside down has made the liturgically improbable more possible. Two local churches…

The Seersucker Revolt

  Revolutions sometimes start in the presence of a bottle of wine. This was probably one of them. A man I know had dropped by the office with a mission on his mind. It was mid-September. A week earlier he…

BEE DAY

We hoped to peacefully co-exist with the bees, allowing them to use our yard in return for pollinating the garden in the back. But then they started working their way through a vent in the bathroom and once in, began…

Discovered: A Worse Name than "Baby Cakes"

  When we last had a chance to see the former New Orleans Baby Cakes in person in 2019 they were playing their final games on Airline Highway. The franchise, it was announced, was relocating to Wichita, Kansas where community…

Rites and Rituals, Shaped by the Times

  We were regulars at a certain neighborhood restaurant and always knew the food to be good and the service efficient, but on a Friday night a few weeks ago things just were not right. Service was slow; very slow.…

A Royal Ramble

  Our driver was from London. As he made his way toward the city, we talked about the wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle that had taken place only a few weeks earlier. I told him that practically all…

Jazz Fest Echoes

Here is a description of what Roy Orbison looked like to me when he performed at the Jazz Fest in 1985: A stick. A black stick on a stage, with a stick band behind it. Oh, and the stage seemed…

Episode 33: Conversation with a Voodoo Priestess

Is Voodoo a religion or is it a way of life? According to Sallie Ann Glassman it is both. Glassman, who travelled to Haiti to study Vodou and to be initiated into the priesthood explains the complexities including the parallels with…

Where Bunnies Roamed

  After a year of experiencing just about any gathering as being “virtual,” we should be craving assemblies that are “actual” even if the congregation is just rabbits. There was a charm about the bunny village on display each year…

Episode 32: Soul and the Holy Spirit

Churches in the Black community are historically known as places where preachers preach with more fervor and where choirs rock the house with hand-clapping joy, hoping for better days. A documentary produced by Louisiana Public Broadcasting entitled, “Louisiana’s Black Church,…

Elmers and Merlins: New Orleans' Confection Connection

  When Rite Aid pharmacies first opened in New Orleans in 1997 the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania company already faced a hostile crowd. The chain had bought out locally owned Katz & Besthoff drug stores, affectionally known as “K&B.” The hurt began…