Newsbeat

Jobs, Meals and Homes on the Riverfront

The hard-working Mississippi riverfront has historically been a source of economic vigor for New Orleans and jobs for its residents. Now, work is underway on the transformation of some long-idled symbols of the riverfront’s past into new tools to help…

Fighting for Fort Pike

Guarding a strategic approach to New Orleans, Fort Pike was built to withstand the worst that an enemy force could throw at it. These days, however, the ravages of time, storms, erosion and neglect are the biggest threats to a…

Re-committing to Rebuilding

As Hurricane Katrina recovery continues on a house-by-house basis in parts of New Orleans, a different sort of initiative, called Project Home Again, has found a way to build back hard-hit Gentilly by leaps and bounds. With more than 100…

Newsbeat: Stadium Plan Looks “Back to the Future”

Before the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, gathering for a big football game in the Crescent City meant a trip to the Tulane Stadium. It was the site for many years of the Sugar Bowl, three Super Bowls and the home field for…

Newsbeat: Big Chief Goes to Washington

Most people encounter Mardi Gras Indians on the streets during parades. But next month, dignitaries and leaders of the arts world will see a very prominent Mardi Gras Indian on the dais accepting one of the nation’s elite artistic honors.…

Newsbeat: Mayor-to-Mayor Money

As mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg is in a position to understand the challenges his peers face in cities across the country. As a billionaire, he’s also in a position to help them with an influx of cash.…

Newsbeat: Reef Relief for the Coast

New Orleanians love finding oysters on their plates, but soon they may have a new reason to be happy about finding them just offshore. As part of a slate of coastal restoration projects now being proposed, the state wants to…

Next, a Sherman Tank

President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously called the United States “the arsenal of democracy” during World War II, and the nation’s prodigious industrial capacity churned out tanks, ships and planes that Allied forces used to prevail around the globe. Now the…

Cooking in Solidarity

New Orleanians know what it means to have an entire community brought low by disaster, but they also know the feeling of gratitude when others help that community. So with the experience of Hurricane Katrina volunteerism still powerfully evocative, a…

Learning Local, Growing Global

The International High School of New Orleans is too new to have a graduating class yet, but this CBD charter school still ended the 2010-’11 academic year with cause for celebration. That is because the school joined the ranks of…

From Prime Cuts to Primary Care

An address long associated with fat steaks and power lunches is being turned into a place for better health and community access for New Orleanians of all walks of life. Tulane University is transforming the former Ruth’s Chris Steak House…

Lost Sediment: A Wasted Flood

The historic flood stages coursing through the Mississippi River this spring reminded the nation of the power inherent in its largest river. For some closer to the issues in southeast Louisiana, however, the experience represented a missed opportunity to capitalize…

Seafood to go

As executive chef of Galatoire’s Restaurant for the past five years, Brian Landry was the steward for an important piece of the New Orleans culinary identity. He left that local landmark in May, however, for a new post tasked with…

Congo Square, the name

The name Congo Square is etched into the cultural fabric of New Orleans. Now, that name is finally, officially attached to the actual square that has been associated with it for so long.The area, located between the Municipal Auditorium and…

Building better pump

The names of once-obscure manmade waterways in New Orleans became synonymous with disaster as breaches in the 17th Street, London Avenue and Orleans Avenue canals flooded much of the city after Hurricane Katrina. But a monumental new flood protection project…

Charter schools making the grade

The charter schools that have so thoroughly transformed the landscape of public education in New Orleans were recently issued a report card of sorts, and it’s one that boosters of the local charter movement can be proud to display on…

New Orleans – the brand

Brands are vital in business, so it was no surprise to hear Forbes magazine publisher Rich Karlgaard focus on brand and image as he recently addressed the annual meeting of the economic development group Greater New Orleans Inc. “New Orleans…

Making groceries made easier

New Orleans is famous for its rich food heritage, but lately local advocates and researchers have been pointing out that for many residents, just getting their hands on groceries can be difficult. A recent survey conducted by Tulane University found…

Newsbeat: Help for Latino day laborers

Signs of a significant influx of Latinos were evident around the New Orleans region long before recent census reports officially detailed the area’s post-Hurricane Katrina demographic changes. One of the most visible signs has been the appearance of Latino day…

Newsbeat: Battling for seafood

American military personnel serve across the country and around the globe, but thanks to a new initiative many more of these service members and their families will be getting a taste of the Gulf Coast when they shop for groceries…

Head count and the “brain gain”

Civic leaders have long battled the idea of “brain drain” in New Orleans. That is, the feared dynamic of the best-educated residents decamping for more promising opportunities in other cities and taking their earning power with them. A more recent…

Paving the way for more bikes

Bicycle lanes are an increasingly common sight along New Orleans streets these days, and a new study from Tulane University shows that where these lanes appear, more cyclists follow; it’s an elementary formula that carries the promise of fewer cars…

Water – and opportunity – everywhere

Given its vulnerability to flooding, it’s no surprise that the New Orleans area is accustomed to viewing water as a threat. But a new program called the Water Venture Development Challenge (or the Water Challenge) suggests that threat may be…

Safe haven at Dooky Chase

For generations, visitors and locals have sung the praises of chef Leah Chase and the Creole cuisine at her family’s Dooky Chase Restaurant. This month, however, the chef and restaurateur will be lauded in an entirely different way when the…

Blight fight shifts gears

Housing blight remains a pervasive problem across New Orleans, but recently the city has embraced a more comprehensive approach to addressing it. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has set a goal of eliminating or remediating 10,000 blighted properties during the next three…

Streetcars create new development

New Orleans streetcars are transit options that also contribute to the city’s ambiance. But as the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (RTA) prepares to begin a new expansion of its streetcar system, it’s becoming clear that they can serve as…

New Orleas Tourism keeps on trucking

Many New Orleanians may feel 2010 was an extraordinarily topsy-turvy time. After all, in the same year the city celebrated its first Super Bowl victory, it found itself on the frontlines of the nation’s worst oil disaster and marked both…

New Orleans Restaurant leadership at the table

New Orleans has long had a strong influence on the American culinary scene. More recently, however, some of the movers and shakers in the local restaurant world have been making their presence felt in national industry circles too. This month,…

Vineyard greens a garden

Wine doesn’t normally top the list of contributions to childhood nutrition, but a new California winery with an affinity for New Orleans is now supporting one local effort that is making school lunch healthier. To mark its recent debut, the…