I have never been one of those people who is anti-United Nations. I always figured that it was beneficial to have a deliberative body trying to bring some measure of stability to the world and the U.N. seemed about as good as anything that has been tried. But then again, the U.N. has never had much to do with life in New Orleans and now that an investigative panel has gotten involved, I wonder – is the world in trouble?
          Recently, two U.N. advisors announced their conclusion that the decision to demolish public housing in New Orleans was "discriminatory." Last Friday, some good reporting by The Times-Picayune revealed that neither of the advisors; Miloon Kothari of New Delhi, India and Gay McDougall of Washington, D.C. had actually visited New Orleans. They were relying on hearsay. Because their pronouncement bore the label of the United Nation it got international attention and must have delighted those who jump at an opportunity to make the United States look racist.
           All of this was despite the fact that the New Orleans City Council, which has three black members, unanimously approved the demolition, and that the mayor, who is also black, agreed. Most importantly, surveys have shown that public housing residents do not want to return to those dreary conditions and welcome the promise of better housing.
         In my profession, if a journalist had conducted such a shabby investigation as the "advisors" he would be fired. Instead those two just made headlines.
         Someone was pulling their strings and I suspect the tug began with one or two people in New Orleans who see themselves as defenders of "social justice," a term that sounds altruistic but that is often abused by the self-righteous. In the name of social justice they have caused near riots, spread lies and embarrassed the city at a time when its people are trying to do right. Slander in the name of justice is no justice at all.

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