The very idea of altering something that has been around for 120 years isn’t everyone’s idea of progress. But young people have other ideas.

Henry Ramos, owner of the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans created his famous Gin Fizz in 1888, and the popular drink has long been considered the second most-quintessential New Orleans-created cocktail (next to the Sazerac).

Along comes talented local mixologist, Rhiannon Enlil, who practices her chosen craft at CURE, Uptown on Freret Street; and at Loa, in the International House Hotel. She has taken the Ramos Gin Fizz and with a few additions, she created the Ginger Baker Fizz, named in honor of the famed drummer in the British rock group, Cream.

She prescribes this beverage, like its famous predecessor, as the perfect morning-after treat. “Everything works in unison and gently,” she notes.

Given the fact that all Gin Fizzes require an extended period of shaking, maybe Jerry Lee Lewis would have been a better namesake. Ah, this younger generation.

The Ginger Baker Fizz
2 ounce Plymouth Gin
3/4 ounce Marie Brizard white crème de cacao
1/2 ounce Canton ginger liqueur
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
3/4 ounce heavy crème
1 egg white
3/4 ounce ginger beer

Shake egg white and lemon juice without ice to a consistent frothy texture. Then add ice, gin, crème de cacao, ginger liqueur and cream. Shake vigorously. Strain contents into a chilled Collins glass and top with ginger beer.