1. The smoke element in Ida Floreak’s “Censer” (16×20-inch) is a nod to the examination of religious fascination with the natural world. Claire Elizabeth Gallery, 131 Decatur St., 309.4063, ClaireElizabethGallery.com.


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2. The torch bearers in all their glory shine in “Lighting of the Flambeaus” (12×12-inch). Billy Solitario Fine Art, 4531 Magazine St., 905-4175, BillySolitario.com.


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3. Artist Katrine Hildebrandt utilizes actual smoke and hand burnt lines with walnut ink on paper to create Glow Expand (12×22-inch). Martine Chaisson Gallery, 727 Camp St., 302-7942, MartineChaissonGallery.com.


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4. Karoline Schleh’s smoke and graphite composition “Smoke Songs” (22×30-inch) features backwards writing to convey the reflective mindset of how words, information and styles are impermanent and shift through time. Callan Contemporary, 518 Julia St., 525-0518, CallanContemporary.com.


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5. The swirling, stylized teal line design using semi-gloss glaze brings Joseph Fortune Meyer’s vase to life (c. 1910-1930). Newcomb Art Museum of Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Circle, 865-5328, NewcombArtMuseum.Tulane.edu.


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6. A puff of exhaust gives the smooth ride pictured in “Camera on d’Eyes” (28×22-inch) all the more gusto. Michalopoulos Gallery, 617 Bienville St., 558-0505, Michalopoulos.com.


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7. The New Orleans sky, as depicted in Carlos Mendieta’s “The Dark End of the Street” (10×7-inch) evokes the sensation of a smoky sky gathering over the rooftops. Where Y’art, 1901 Royal St., 325-5672, WhereYart.net.